Modular Prefab Homes by Modscape, Australia







About Modscape
Materials and Engineering Systems Manufacturers




Solar House - Solar Power Off-the-Grid Prefab Home

Winner of Solar Decathlon 2007







Plan
Interior
Exterior
Project participants
Innovative materials manufacturers

Design: Students of the TU Darmstadt, Department of Design and Energy Efficient Construction, Prof. Manfred Hegger (Project Management)
Project: Solar House
Location: El-Lissitzky-Straße 3, 64287 Darmstadt, Hesse
Year: 2007
Client: TU Darmstadt (+ operator + user)
Gross floor area: 72 m²
Heated net floor area: 50 m²
Gross volume: 182 m³
Heating requirement (EnEV): 12,00 kWh / m²a
Usable area (according to EnEV): 58 m²
A / V ratio: 1.15 m-1
Architecture and engineering systems: thermal insulation, façade systems, glazing + windows, daylight planning, ventilation + heat recovery, active cooling, regenerative + passive cooling,
thermally activated component systems, heat pump, heat / cold storage, control engineering, plant management, building automation, solar thermal energy, photovoltaics, biomass utilization, building materials ecology




The solar power off-the-grid prefab home "Solar House" designed by students of the TU Darmstadt has won the international competition "Solar Decathlon 2007" for the most attractive and energy-efficient solar house. The energy self-sufficient prefab home was built on the campus of the TU Darmstadt and transported to the USA after completion.

The house is a wooden lightweight construction with low heat storage mass compared to massive new buildings. In order to combine maximum living comfort with the lowest energy consumption, a compact and highly insulated building envelope was chosen. During the hot summer days, the shading of the windows help to avoid overheating the interiors. The shading elements consist of the southern roof overhang and the lamellar shell of oak, which opens and closes when needed.

Plasterboard with integrated phase change material (PCM) compensate for heat peaks. They store the heat energy generated during the day and release it at night. Per volume unit, the material can store six times as much heat as concrete and thus acts as a latent heat storage. Once the wax contained in the PCM has completely melted, no further heat can be absorbed. Cooling can be achieved by cross-ventilation between the north and south sides during the night or by passive cooling system of the PV modules on the roof. For this purpose, a built-in double soil water reservoir is used, which is connected to a heat exchanger. On the opposite side of the heat exchanger is the cooling circuit, which consists of capillary tube mats in the ceiling. These absorb the heat of the phase change material and transport it into the water tank. This allows the PCM to actively cool constantly.

FutureHAUS - Smart, Solar Energy, Prefab Modular Home for Sustainable Development

Winner of Solar Decathlon Middle East 2018







Video
Construction
About Solar Decathlon Middle East

Virginia Tech’s project participants:

College of Science
College of Engineering
Pamplin College of Business
Department of Computer Science
Myers-Lawson School of Construction
Center for Human-Computer Interaction
College of Architecture and Urban Studies
College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences


The prefabricated modular design of the smart solar energy prefab modular home for sustainable development allowed FutureHAUS to be constructed in just two days. Following the two week construction period, a ten day competition period challenged the team to complete tasks simulating real-life tasks, give tours to the public and juries, and perform tasks like hosting dinner parties and driving electric vehicles. International juries scored the house on criteria including Architecture, Sustainability, Innovation, Energy Efficiency and Engineering and Construction.




In addition to winning the competition, FutureHAUS Dubai took home the following trophies:


  • First Place in Architecture
  • First Place in House Functioning
  • First Place in Sustainable Transportation
  • First Place in Create Solutions
  • Second Place in Interior Design
  • Second Place in Sustainability
  • Second Place in Innovation
  • Third Place in Engineering and Construction
  • Third Place in Energy Efficiency Measures
  • Third Place in Comfort Conditions


Concept

Inspired by the best production practices of the automotive and airplane industry, the FutureHAUS (smart solar energy prefab modular home for sustainable development) explores the process of prefabrication to deliver modular structures that integrate smart technologies, energy efficient systems, and new materials. Our innovative prototype proposes a factory produced, energy-positive, smart home. The goal is to not only invent the future of housing with the integration of smart technologies, but also invent the future of how they will be built.

Housing is about to get a whole lot better

In recent years, innovations in digital technologies, such as smartphones, computers and robotics for fabrication in construction have revolutionized the way we live, work and build. The presence of technology in everyday life has become so engrained that it would be impossible to function today without it - as we have fully embraced the expectation of convenience and support that high performance technology offers. While present cutting-edge technology has been well integrated into the design and manufacturing most high-performance products like aircraft, automobiles, appliances and computers, the construction industry, by contrast, has been slow if not resistant to change in its operations.

With the FutureHAUS, the research team is challenging the construction industry by demonstrating the use of advanced manufacturing processes to make an energy positive smart solar energy prefab modular home for sustainable development.


Prefab Glass Walls Store/Shop with Metal Frame







About Supra Design - Augusta Design

Project: Ribeirão Preto CASACOR Store
Design: Supra Design - Augusta Design
Architects: Mathe Benetti and Dariane Bertoni
Area: 30 m²
Year: 2018

The Ribeirão Preto CASACOR Store, signed by Supra Design office and operated by Augusta Design, is an interpretation of the annual theme of A Casa Viva. The structures of the construction of the commercial space were designed so that all the elements can be disassembled and reassembled in another place, in order to keep the architecture that follows alive and itinerant.




Architects Mathe Benetti and Dariane Bertoni bring industrial modernity to the atmosphere of space. Constructive materials transcend the walls and present themselves as resignified decorative elements. Scaffolding appears as bookshelves and other industrial materials, usually used as the basis of a work, are seen with the naked eye and dialogue with the objects selected by the store's curator.

At the CASACOR Shop by Augusta Design, the commercial space of only 30 m², glass walls add to the ambience and eliminate the feeling of confinement and allow the dialogue between internal and external areas at CASACOR Ribeirão Preto 2018.


SysHaus - 200 sqm Sustainable Prefab Home







About Arthur Casas

Architecture: Arthur Casas Design
Area: 200 sqm
Landscaping: Renata Tilli
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
Year: 2018
Photography: Filippo Bamberghi




Some say houses are made of brick;
Some say they are made of the relationship between spaces;
There are also those who say they are made of mishaps.
We believe that home is time and space.
It is to enjoy time in the best space.

Arthur Casas introduces the SysHaus sustainable prefab home modular system at its pre-launch at CASACOR São Paulo 2018. The technology developed by his office made it possible to build a high-end home in less than a month, with virtually zero waste and water consumption. Each part of the project has been designed exclusively on the basis of needs and specifications, extremely efficiently and functionally, without debris and with reduced execution time.

With 200 m², the structure of pillars, beams and steel screws does not require foundation and concreting. Everything is docked from floor to ceiling. About 90% of the components come from the bespoke factory. In addition, 100% of the materials used are recyclable, and there is a green roof, which naturally contributes to thermal and acoustic comfort, giving the utmost respect to nature in all construction processes.

Generous openings allow the sustainable prefab home to be crossed by ventilation and natural light, reducing energy consumption with lighting and air conditioning. The furniture was designed in modules, ie, just like the structure of the sustainable prefab home, can be assembled in another location. Other pieces of furniture, utilities, finishes and even accessories, such as jewelry, were designed by Arthur in partnership with large companies and national industries - most of them being launched. The house's landscaping is by Renata Tilli, who opted for species that adapt to the climate of any region.

The constructive method will also be commercialized including sustainable everyday practices. In all SysHaus sustainable prefab homes will be installed: the rainwater catchment and reuse mechanism; a biodigestion system that transforms organic waste into gas for use in the fireplace and kitchen, and fertilizer for use in the garden; and sockets for electric vehicles. The customer can also opt for photovoltaic panels, which, through their intelligent monitoring system, make the most of energy. It is estimated that construction can be completed within six months from conception to key delivery.

Factory installed eco-friendly systems

Using technology, engineering and design, SysHaus makes this thinking an effective practice. Its innovative construction method allows the assembly of the pieces intended for each of its spaces to be done without waste generation and excessive consumption of natural resources, whose waste is quite common in conventional constructions. In addition, 100% of the materials used are recyclable, and there is the option of green roofing, which naturally contributes to thermal and acoustic comfort, with the utmost respect for nature in all construction processes.




Sustainable daily practices are also achieved through three items, installed in all sysHaus houses: the mechanism for capturing and reusing rainwater; a biodigestion system that transforms organic waste into gas for use in the fireplace and kitchen, and fertilizer for use in the garden; and sockets for electric vehicles. In addition, photovoltaic panels can also be installed, which, through their intelligent monitoring system, make the most of energy and generate zero cost on the bill.

Sustainability for SysHaus is more than a philosophy; It is an integral part of everything you do, both in designing your production process and applying these practices at every stage of your projects.


NeighborHub - Sustainable Solar Power Prefab House

Winner of Solar Decathlon 2017








Team
Coordination
Groups and Tasks
About Solar Decathlon
About Swiss Living Challenge
About University of Friborg (UNIFR)
About Geneva School of Art and Design (HEAD)
About University of Applied Sciences of Freiburg (HEIA-FR)
About Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL)




Project

The aim of the Swiss Living Challenge project is to encourage people to reduce their energy consumption and ultimately preserve the country's natural resources.

How are we going to do it? To really reduce our energy consumption, we must act on a daily basis, from our mobility to our food. The Swiss Living Challenge project (which brings together 4 universities) offers alternatives that suggest to the inhabitants of a district to adopt sustainable features thanks to its sustainable solar power prefab house, the NeighborHub.

NeighborHub

The team has built a sustainable solar power prefab house for a neighborhood, initiating changes and integrable in different urban areas. Named NeighborHub - this space aims to converge the inhabitants of a neighborhood and imagine with them solutions to consume less and better.

We must act together to reduce our consumption. The NeighborHub will be a place for meetings and exchanges where activities will be held and where we will share moments of life. There will be tools and alternatives for seven levers of action we can act on:


  • energy
  • water management
  • waste management
  • mobility
  • food
  • materials
  • biodiversity


Local residents will benefit from advice, interactive activities and conferences around these themes. The NeighborHub is also architecturally designed to adapt to all these moments of sharing with a large multifunctional space.

By changing our habits today, we can change the world of tomorrow.



7 Levers of Action

Energy

The electricity production is provided by 29 photovoltaic solar panels arranged only in frontage. Two batteries make it possible to manage the production and consumption flows to ensure a supply corresponding to needs of sustainable solar power prefab house inhabitants.

Water Management

With regard to water management, the aim of the Swiss Living Challenge is not simply to reduce its consumption. Indeed, it is essential to differentiate the various qualities of water that enters and leaves a sustainable solar power prefab house, assigning it the proper use or valuation. For example, the rainwater collected on the roof is fed to washing machine.

Biodiversity

The vegetated roof and the phytopurification basin serve as habitat for flora and fauna. In addition, vertical greenhouses integrated in the structure of the doors welcome shoots of local plants. One of the most important energy consumption items is mobility.

Mobility

A change in our habits supported by the provision of shared electric cars, bicycles or tricycles would reduce our consumption in this area.

Waste management

As far as waste management is concerned, the aim is first of all to reduce waste and this goes through choices such as shopping at the market and buying vegetables without packaging. Since zero waste is not so easy to achieve, product reuse and recycling remain important points in the economy of our resources.

Materials

Choosing to be surrounded by healthy materials that do not release harmful particles and promote good air quality is important for our health but also for the environment. The entire structure of the sustainable solar power prefab house is made of wood. In addition, the kitchen worktop is made of 75% recycled materials such as porcelain, ceramic, glass or mirror.

Food

In the NeighborHub, a common kitchen is available to the inhabitants. They can organize courses to share their culinary knowledge and together find tips to consume more sustainable. Around the NeighborHub there are also vegetable gardens where gardening classes take place.


Description from Solar Decathlon

The bar was set sky high from the very start. As soon as the Swiss Living Challenge team set foot in the Solar Decathlon arena when scouting the SDE14 event in Versailles, they knew; they could go the extra mile. And they did. One house for a single family? Why not for a whole community? The Swiss Team thrived, and three years later they won first place during the SD17 competition in Denver, USA. The secret to their success? A big part was the social aspect, which was key to the NeighborHub project.

The Swiss Team’s NeighborHub sustainable solar power prefab house was immediately identified as an instigator of change. The notion of a communal space where neighbours are inspired toward energy-efficiency & behavioural change was embraced by visitors touring the NeighbourHub at the SD17 event, all in the name of resource-responsibility. In this process of learning by doing, the emphasis on human interaction to incite change reflected the collaborative and integral character of both the Swiss team and the NeighborHub itself. “Innovation is about integration on all sorts of levels,” says former decathlete Florian Meyer. He was part of the Swiss Team’s engineering group and worked on the electrical systems of the house.

To the Neighborhood

It took total dedication and a fundamental joint effort to turn the NeighborHub concept into reality. The Swiss sustainable solar power prefab house was designed by a total of 250 students and professors from four schools: École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, the School of Engineering and Architecture of Fribourg, the Geneva School of Art and Design, and the University of Fribourg. “The connection between team members was very strong,” Florian said. Besides the hands-on approach, what drew him to the project was the interdisciplinary spirit of the team: “It was incredible to work with such a diverse team from beginning to end.” In addition, The Swiss Living Challenge team was supported by 150 teaching staff members from industry and academia. Recently, Florian and his former team members joint forces again as the NeighborHub came back to life in April, 2018 at the smart living lab of blueFACTORY in Fribourg, Switzerland. “We built the NeighborHub such that it would be robust to adaptations in various contexts and urban settings,” Florian explains.

Vegetated Roof

He continues, explaining that the NeighborHub might not include the most state-of-the art technologies; however, the ways in which all elements come together are unique, maybe even cutting edge: the Swiss Team worked toward a seamless integral system of technology and design. One of the NeighborHub sustainable solar power prefab house’s eye-catching features is its vegetated roof, free of solar panels, designed to stimulate biodiversity in urban settings. The roof houses very particular nectar-giving plants that provide sustenance to bees, whose alarming decline in numbers is currently a pressing EU issue. Simultaniously, the roof absorbs rainwater via its plants and gathers it elsewhere for use in certain household appliance such as the washing machine. Wastewater from such appliances is treated in a phyto-purification basin next to the NeighborHub where reeds absorb a large quantity of pollutants out of this wastewater. Purified wastewater can then be infiltrated in the ground, for example, to water other plants. It is a beautiful example of how the Swiss Team aimed to create closed systems to maximise efficiency in and around the NeighborHub sustainable solar power prefab house.

Snow Proof

Instead of placing solar panels on the roof, the Swiss Team ingeniously attached their photovoltaic solar panels to the facades and doors of the NeighborHub sustainable solar power prefab house. They designed the doors to open vertically like a garage door where the wall rotates towards the exterior and then towards the top. As such, solar panels can adapt their orientation according to the position of the sun, allowing the sustainable solar power prefab house to capture more energy as the seasons change.

This means that in winter, the external walls remain closed in vertical position to accommodate the solar panels to the lower position of the sun. During the SD17 Competition this characteristic proved itself exeptionally useful when falling snow in Denver had no effect on the effectivity of the NeighborHub’s solar panels. In summer, the external walls remain open and the solar panels are inclined at a 35-degree angle to maximize the high position of the sun. In this configuration, the wall creates a covered terrace that goes all around the prefab house, enabling the NeighborHub to capture solar energy while simultaneously providing shade to the people moving around the house. As such, design and optimal comfort for the community go hand in hand.




Talk to the Neighborhub

As for Florian, he knows the business of making systems and devices communicate with each other to exchange information, and developed the ‘Talk to the NeighborHub’ app. The application monitors and integrates all sorts of technological house data, which is then translated into engaging information that its users can comprehend. “If all lights in the NeighborHub prefab house are switched on, the app prompts the question whether it is necessary to keep them on,” Florian explains. The above and many other aspects of the NeighborHub solar power prefab house’s design makes the community sustainable house an inspiring meeting place for local residents to co-create solutions for consuming both less and better.

In the coming five years, the NeighborHub prefab house opens up room at the smart living lab of Freiburg for a range of activities such as eco-friendly cooking classes with local foods, bike repair workshops, gardening lessons or coworking days and other social gatherings. As such, the NeighborHub solar power house carries on as a social hub in Switzerland to work together towards sustainable solutions on energy, water management, biodiversity, waste management, mobility, materials, and food.